Put Some Junk in your Trunk!!

Among the many things they made us human is the capacity for continuous upright walking and one of the things that has allowed that to happen was a relatively very powerful gluteus maximus muscle. A well developed pair of gluteal muscles are not only aesthetically pleasing but they are also tremendously functionally important.  

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FAS (Flat Ass Syndrome) seems to affect most of the population, particularly with aging and it is fairly typically associated with the “GranDad bod”, this follow the “Dad bod” by about 20 years and is not only frightening to see but also represents advancing sarcopenia.  

 

As you know I’m a big fan of proper nutrition and plenty of protein, especially when it comes in the form of steak.  But nutrition alone is often not enough to ward off the horrors of FAS.

 

A few key exercises performed regularly coupled with plenty of bovine deliciousness will help keep your trunk full of solid high performance muscle. In no particular order, my favorites are;

 

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Kettlebell swings, with relatively heavy weight done RKC style with emphasis of a solid glute contraction at the top of the swing. I’ve personally done these with up to 203lbs x 20 reps. Learn proper form and then gradually build up your capacity to handle heavier weights.  This is something that can be done multiple times per week.

 

Deadlifts- again the glute activation occurs at the top of the lift so don’t forget to drive it home at the top of the lift.  Either trap bar or standard bar can be utilized here 

 

Step-ups/lunges- these are unilateral exercises that can be done with moderate weight added to get a little more bang for your buck.  My favorite way to add weight here is with a weighted vest

 

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Squats-these should be a staple of any exercise program and there are many varieties.  I suggest you find several and rotate them regularly

 

Weighted hip thrusts- sort of a new kid on the block when it comes to exercises. These have some good EMG data to show them to be great for isolation and activating gluteal muscle.  Adequate padding is a must especially as quite a bit of weight can often be handled.

 

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Uphill sprints- the incline forces you to use more gluteal contraction to power your movement and are a generally great exercise.  One of my childhood athletic heroes, Chicago Bears legendary running back, the late Walter Payton developed much of his athletic power running hills!

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Shawn Baker